Installing an SSL Certificate for Citrix App Layering – Enterprise Layering Management 4.2

In testing Citrix App Layering (Unidesk) in my lab, I wanted to install an SSL certificate on the Enterprise Layering Management (ELM) appliance. My first try didn’t go well so I thought I would document the process I followed on the second try, which did work.

After importing in the 4.2.0.46 OVA file, I logged into the CentOS console and configured the basic networking stuff as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1

Figure 1

Next, I used Internet Exploder, I mean Explorer (IE) to start the rest of the configuration steps.

After setting the passwords for the three management accounts, the next item was the HTTP Certificate Settings.

One of the awesome benefits of being a CTP is that DigiCert gives the CTPs almost unlimited SSL certificates. Thank you very much, DigiCert.

The first thing I needed to do was to generate a CSR file so I could give it to DigiCert for my certificate request. Since ELM is based on CentOS Linux, it has OpenSSL included. I found a helpful article from DigiCert support that automatically generates the required OpenSSL command as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2

Figure 2

I use PuTTY to log on to the console as root and pasted in the OpenSSL command that DigiCert supplied as shown in Figure 3.

Note: There is a bug in a fresh import of the 4.2 appliance where the wizard used to change the three account’s passwords does not change the password for root. To login as root, use the default password.

Figure 3

Figure 3

Next, I used WinSCP to download the two files created as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4

Figure 4

I used the CSR file to request my SSL certificate from DigiCert.

Once I received my ZIP file, I extracted the certificate files to the same folder I placed the CSR and KEY files downloaded from the ELM appliance as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5

Figure 5

Using Notepad++, I opened the CRT and KEY files and created a new blank unidesk_labaddomain_com.pem file. I then copied the contents of the KEY file first into the PEM file and then added the CRT file to the bottom of the PEM file as shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6

Figure 6

Back in the browser interface for the ELM appliance, click Edit for HTTP Certificate Settings as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7

Figure 7

Click Upload as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 8

Figure 8

Browse to the PEM file created earlier, select it and click Open as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9

Figure 9

Verify the Uploaded Certificate information is correct. If it is, click Save as shown in Figure 10. If the information is not correct, you may need to either recreate the PEM file or receive a new SSL certificate.

Figure 10

Figure 10

Click Yes to restart the web server as shown in Figure 11.

Figure 11

Figure 11

I created a DNS A record to match the SSL certificate as shown in Figure 12.

Figure 12

Figure 12

Once the browser window refreshes, exit IE, restart IE and browse to https://FQDN of the ELM appliance as shown in Figure 13.

Notice there are no SSL certificate errors even though the PEM file did not contain any Intermediate or Root certificate information.

Figure 13

Figure 13

I want to give a shout out to Kyle at DigiCert support for all the time he spent with me on working through this process.

Thanks

Webster

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About Carl Webster

Webster is a Sr. Solutions Architect for Choice Solutions, LLC and specializes in Citrix, Active Directory and Technical Documentation. Webster has been working with Citrix products for many years starting with Multi-User OS/2 in 1990.

View all posts by Carl Webster

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